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  • Taylor Webster

Calling All Momtographers | 3 Steps to Better Photos


Hey mama!

Do you struggle getting good photos of your kids?! Once they hit a certain age, it becomes a huge battle that is not often worth fighting.

If you own a DSLR camera I'm here to help you! Point and shoot cameras do not give you much control over your settings so they're very limited.

You first need to decide what is it you want out of your photos! Genuine smiles? Lighter images? That creamy blurry background? With a little education we will get there!


1. Genuine Smiles

Once they hit 18 months children seem impossible to photograph! On the move, the tantrums, not looking at the camera.. the list goes on and on.

Prepare prepare prepare! Tell them. They may seem small but they are smarter than you think! Tell them were going to put on a pretty outfit sit down and take pictures. Offer a little bribe! It works , get a handful of m&ms or a fruit snacks! There is no shame , it will help them focus on something as well as motivation to behave.

Play or sing their favorite song - at my house ABC's work wonders as well as the Mickey Mouse Hot Dog song. Singing a song and doing a silly dance will normally do the trick!


2. Creamy Blurry Background

Understanding the exposure triangle will make a huge difference in your photos! That blurry background everyone knows and loves is called bokeh. You will want to start by turning your camera to aperture priority mode. The lower the F-Stop (aperture) the blurrier the background will be. Your camera will auto populate the other settings for you!

To get even more bokeh put some distance between your subject and the background. The farther they are from a background the more blur you will have.


3. Lighter Photos

There are two different ways to achieve a lighter photo from both a technical prospective as well as wardrobe and backgrounds.

If you have your camera in aperture priority mode and the images are not as light as you'd like. First set your aperture (F-Stop) then turn up your ISO. ISO controls how sensitive the camera is to light. Start at 100 and slowly go up. The higher you go you may experience some grain.

If you learn to understand the exposure triangle you can have full control over the way your photos look. Aperture, ISO, and shutter speed all have to work together to get the best photo.

ISO and aperture cant help you if you're in a black room to get a light and airy look. So be mindful of your surroundings. Find a white or cream wall, an open grassy spot, or your white kitchen or dining room table. Chose outfits with light colors in the same color palette.

Go grab your kiddo and get to practice! Send them to me! I'd love to see!


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